Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Outdoor Recreation for Seniors (ORFS) Bowl at Maple Lanes Bowling, Claremont, NH

This past Tuesday our 10 am adventure was at the Maple Lanes Bowling All125 Maple Ave, Claremont, NH 0374.  One of the ORFS rare indoor adventures, it is low cost and absolutely a fun time to chat and root for each.   Being experienced in bowling is certainly not necessary - only being able to laugh at yourself and for each other is mandatory. 

You do need to choose whether to do ten-pins or candle pins.



Thank you to Skip for leading this fun ORFS Tuesday gathering.

Directions to Maple Lanes
Directions from Claremont Opera House square: Take Pleasant St. South toward Charleston for 0.09 mile. Turn right at stoplight onto Maple Ave. and go 0.6 mile, turning right at Citco sign into Maple Lanes at 125 Maple Lane. Afterward we will meet at Imperial Chinese Buffet for lunch which is the next left after Wal-Mart turn off at 154 Washington St.

Who are the ORFS?
The Outdoor Recreation for Seniors (ORFS) group meets every Tuesday year-round at 10 am. In the summer we kayak/canoe, swim and hike. In the fall we hike, and in the winter we snowshoe and cross-country ski. Our trips are from 1-1/2 to 2 hours, followed by lunch.

Directions and location are available for our Tuesday 10 am outings via email and the monthly New London Chapin Senior Center Courier newsletter. To learn more and join, contact the Chapin Senior Center at 357 pleasant Street, PO Box 1263, New London, New Hampshire 03752 or go to their web site at
http://www.coachapincenter.org

ORFS is a very informal group and participation is for all outdoor enthusiasts wanting guaranteed good exercise with a friendly fun group.

******************************************
" Everyone must do something. I believe I will go outdoors with family and friends"
++++++++++++++++


Steve's 6th book is now available. Outdoor Play "Fun 4 Seniors" Volume III has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. Motivate friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life.

Steve’s books are also available as hardcopy and e-Books at Kindle and Morgan Hill Bookstore, New London, NH.

Wednesday, November 27, 2019

Outdoor Recreation for Seniors (ORFS) visit VINS in Quechee, VT


Today’s weekly Tuesday 10 am gathering of the New Hampshire and Vermont Outdoor Recreation for Seniors, nicknamed ORFS, is at the Vermont Institute of Natural Science, identified as VINS, along the banks of the Ottauquechee River in Quechee, VT. Its neighbor is the picturesque Quechee Gorge on Vermont Route 4.
VINS is located on 47 acres of forest, meadow, and rolling hills, and features state-of-the-art rehabilitation enclosures that houses hawks, eagles, falcons, owls, and other birds of prey. Plus turtles and snakes. Today the raptors will demonstrate their flying skills to us. 


VINS in October 2019 opened their awesome $1.6 state-of-the-art handicap accessible Forest Canopy Walk that provides treetop views 50 plus feet above ground. This magnificent walkway is breathtaking. 

Thank you very much to the staff and volunteers of VINS. Your hospitality, education sessions, tours, and your beautiful facility are very much appreciated.

For more information:


Who are the ORFS?
The Outdoor Recreation for Seniors (ORFS) group meets every Tuesday year-round at 10 am. In the summer we kayak/canoe, swim and hike. In the fall we hike, and in the winter we snowshoe and cross-country ski. Our trips are from 1-1/2 to 2 hours, followed by lunch.

Directions and location are available for our Tuesday 10 am outings via email and the monthly New London Chapin Senior Center Courier newsletter. To learn more and join, contact the Chapin Senior Center at 357 pleasant Street, PO Box 1263, New London, New Hampshire 03752 or go to their web site at
 http://www.coachapincenter.org

ORFS is a very informal group and participation is for all outdoor enthusiasts wanting guaranteed good exercise with a friendly fun group.
******************************************
" Everyone must do something. I believe I will go outdoors with family and friends"
++++++++++++++++


Steve's 6th book is now available. Outdoor Play "Fun 4 Seniors" Volume III has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. Motivate friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life.

Steve’s books are also available as hardcopy and e-Books at Kindle and Morgan Hill Bookstore, New London, NH.

Tuesday, November 12, 2019

ORFS at Green Woodlands Foundation, Lyme, NH



(Note: I have edited the below content from http://www.greenwoodlands.org/home/recreationaluse.html.)  

The Green Woodlands offer outdoor enthusiasts opportunities for four-season wilderness fun. Green Woodlands is a thirty-five square mile wilderness area only fifteen miles from Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. The owners generously allow free use of the property for hiking, mountain biking, and cross country skiing. There are over 80 miles of well-marked hiking and XC skiing trails.

PLEASE respect and appreciate the opportunity the Green Woodlands Foundation is providing us. If you go to the Green Woodlands, I strongly suggest you first read the content in their web site – and of course read all post signs. A good policy for any outdoor enthusiast is to “leave the area better than you found it.”

Today the Outdoor Recreation for Seniors (ORFS) hike along Cummins Pond and cross its outlet streams. We brought lunches and ate while dangling our legs on a wooden bridge above a bubbling mountain stream. 


Green Woodlands allow the public on the vast majority of their property, with only about 20 acres restricted for their privacy.  This area is clearly marked, and I am sure you agree that this is a very reasonable request.

Allowing the public onto our property is always a balancing act. We allow many uses of the property but there are some uses that just do not coexist well with our version of connecting to nature. We therefore are very strict about not allowing motorized wheeled vehicles onto the property. This prohibition includes 4 wheelers, motorcycles, cars, and trucks. We also do not allow camping, parking of campers or motor homes or camp fires and grilling of any kind. We appreciate your assistance with these requests.

Green Woodlands Foundation is a multi-generational family organization with a goal of preserving a little piece of nature for many future generations. Through their foundation their primary activities are wildlife management and environmental research and education, historical preservation, and events that get people out into the woods such as hiking, paddling, snowshoeing, cross country skiing and mountain biking.  They currently have land under forest management in the towns of Lyme, Dorchester, Orford and Wentworth, New Hampshire. The property has eight remote ponds with the largest being Cummins Pond at approximately 160 acres.

In 2009 a fellow outdoor friend and I had an adventure in locating Cummins Pond.  At this time this pristine location was an isolated and extremely difficult place to access with a vehicle carrying kayaks.  We reached the Pond on a Class 6 road that had boulders galore in the road and potholes extreme. Traversing the road with my Jeep required my friend to walk in front of my vehicle to insure the Jeep did not bottom out.  It took nearly an hour to reach the put-in on the southern end of the Pond. This trip was well worth our effort.  

Finally with ORFS leaders John and Judy, I returned to Cummins Pond – this time for a trail hike while keeping an eye open for a way to access Cummins Pond with kayaks.  On the hike I met one of the owners and inquired about an access to Cummins Pond with kayaks. She pointed out a less challenging drive for my Jeep to reach Cummins Pond for kayaking.

Hiking and Trail Running
Hiking and trail running are welcome on any of the Greenwood Land trails during non-winter months.  The owners ask hikers and runners not walk or run on the groomed cross country ski trails during the winter.

Maps
At the intersections of the majority of ski and bike trails there are 24" by 36" map kiosks to show “You are here.”  You can also download geo-referenced ski and bike trail maps on this site.
There are also brochures with maps located in most parking areas.

USE AT YOUR OWN RISK: We are fortunate that New Hampshire has very strong laws limiting landowner liability when they allow the public to use their property. Without this release of liability most of the trails and millions of acres of private property that are used by the public for recreational purposes such as this would be closed. This is just a reminder that you enter this property “AT YOUR OWN RISK”.

Signs and brochures warn that you should use this property with an understanding that there are hazardous spots; bare spots, ice, changing snow, bumps, rocks, trees, moose, grooming equipment, getting lost, snowmobiles, dogs, and other hazards exist. You must recognize such dangers, whether marked or unmarked, and realize that falls and collisions are common, and injuries may result. By entering this property, you accept the hazards and dangers of injury incident, including negligence and carelessness on the part of others.

Green Woodlands post signs saying they have no have trail guards or monitors and they do not perform an end of day sweep of the trails. In other words, this is wilderness property and we all have to be responsible for ourselves. Note there is almost no cell service out here. Amen.

Directions
Directions from New London, NH: Take Interstate 89 North to exit 18. Follow Route 120 North to Hanover then bear right onto Route 10 North and follow about 9 miles North into Lyme. After passing the Lyme Green, bear right onto Dorchester Road toward the Dartmouth Skiway.  Just before the Dartmouth Skiway, turn left to continue on Dorchester. Dorchester Road is a dirt road from here on. Follow the road to the end and there is a large parking lot on the left.  There is a sign with trail maps at the parking lot.

References
" Everyone must do something. I believe I will go outdoors with family and friends"
++++++++++++++++


Steve's 6th book is now available. Outdoor Play "Fun 4 Seniors" Volume III has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. Motivate friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life.

Steve’s books are also available as hardcopy and e-Books at Kindle and Morgan Hill Bookstore, New London, NH.

Colby-Sawyer College vs University of New England Woman's Rugby

A friend invited me to a Colby-Sawyer College (CSC) versus the University of New England Woman's Rugby game.

My first experience with  Rugby was through my son Timothy. While a student at New England College (Henniker, NH), Timothy was a player, coach and captain of the New England College Men's Rugby Team.  Watching Tim both play and coach gave me insight to this interesting sport. 

Below are a few clips I took of the game. Never say, "I wish I had gone to a Colby-Sawyer College Rugby Game."



Colby-Sawyer College
New London, NH
https://www.outdoorsteve.com

" Everyone must do something. I believe I will go outdoors with family and friends"
++++++++++++++++


Steve's 6th book is now available. Outdoor Play "Fun 4 Seniors" Volume III has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. Motivate friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life.

Steve’s books are also available as hardcopy and e-Books at Kindle and Morgan Hill Bookstore, New London, NH.

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

ORFS Hike Mascoma River portion of the Northern Rail Trail, Enfield NH

The Outdoor Recreation for Seniors, known as ORFS, meet every Tuesday at 10 am year-round. In the summer we kayak, swim and hike. In the fall we hike, and in the winter we snowshoe and cross-country ski. Our trips are from 1-1/2 to 2 hours, followed by lunch.

This Tuesday's hike is in Enfield, NH on the Riverside Drive section of the Northern Rail Trail. The Northern Rail Trail, is a 58-mile multi-use former railroad trail in western New Hampshire, running from Lebanon to Boscawen. It shares the right-of-way of the Boston and Maine Railroad's former Northern Line, which was acquired by the State of New Hampshire in 1996. The ORFS are hiking the Mascoma River portion of the Northern Rail Trail, known on the map as the Riverway Drive Trail or Enfield MP 132. 



The Enfield portion of the trail from our parking area on Riverway follows the Mascoma River upstream to Mascoma Lake, using three bridges to crisscross the River. Barbara is our trip organizer and leader today. The Northern Railroad built this line from Concord to White River Junction, Vermont, in 1847 


The Boston-based investors were one of three groups in a race to connect with a line coming up the Connecticut River valley, and thus on to Quebec. Daniel Webster spoke at the ribbon-cutting in Lebanon, "It is altogether new. The world has seen nothing like it before." Not in attendance - by choice - among the 1,200 at the inauguration of the "steam highway" were any of the Shaker community from nearby Enfield. The Shakers had worked a deal with the railroad to relocate its proposed corridor to the opposite side of Mascoma Lake from their colony, while getting a bridge to its depot. A stock purchase and the naming of a locomotive The Shaker sealed the bargain. In 1887, the company was acquired by the Boston and Maine Railroad. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Rail_Trail_(New_Hampshire).


Today's fall hike was planned by Phyllis and Barbara, with Barbara leading the hike.

Directions from New London, NH

 Go north on route 89 to exit 17. Turn right at the exit onto Route 4 east toward Enfield and Mascoma Lake. In about ¼ mile take the first left onto Riverside Drive. Go about ½ mile to the parking area on the right. This is the Riverside Drive entry onto the Northern Rail Trail. When you get to the trail take the right-hand direction toward Mascoma Lake. Go as far as you wish, then walk back to the parking area at the start of the hike.

References

Friends of the Northern Rail Trail
https://fnrt.org/

http://www.northernrailtrail.org

Http://www.nhtrailtrails.org
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Rail_Trail_(New_Hampshire)

For Information on the ORFS

http://www.coachapincenter.org/orfs/

OutdoorSteve.com
http://www.outdoorsteve.com


" Everyone must do something. I believe I will go outdoors with family and friends"
++++++++++++++++


Steve's 6th book is now available. Outdoor Play "Fun 4 Seniors" Volume III has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. Motivate friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life.

Steve’s books are also available as hardcopy and e-Books at Kindle and Morgan Hill Bookstore, New London, NH.

Saturday, October 19, 2019

Colby-Sawyer College: Adventures in Learning: Outdoor Play "Fun 4 Seniors"


Never say, "I wish I had gone outside with family and friends and just enjoy each other."

An e-book of all class presentations including links to all videos has been created for AIL members attending Steve's "Outdoor Play Fun 4 Seniors." Click Here

*** Slide Overview: Four-Week Course - "Outdoor Play Fun 4 Seniors"***







****List of Bucket List for Class to Select for Presentation and Discussion



**** Outdoor Recreation for Seniors (ORFS) and Class Selected Bucket List Trips








Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Gabriella and Linda do Hang Gliding Instruction at Morningside


My brother Edward had a milestone birthday this year. His daughter, Gabriella, gave him a "bucket list" gift of an Introductory Hang Gliding Lesson at Morningside in Charlestown, New Hampshire. Gabriella was to participate with her Dad in the class.

Unfortunately, Ed had a minor physical injury, so was not able to do the class.

Fortunately, Ed still wanted to see Gabriella take the hang gliding course. Gabriella invited a friend, Linda, to take Ed’s place in the four-hour hang gliding class.

Ed and I observed Gabriell and Linda at the hang gliding site. We were able to be on-site with both students and instructor, and we fully enjoyed this "up front and personal" perspective in this level ground and slope hang gliding class.

The Morningside instructor, Dave, was part of the enjoyment of the course. He was very thorough, patient, and he readily shared his extensive knowledge and excitment for hang gliding. 


Edward, Gabriella, and Linda, also stayed overnight with my wife and me, and we were able to share with them New Hampshire hospitality including our beautiful New Hampshire foliage.

My below video is a summary of Gabriella and Linda taking their instruction.

Happy Birthday Ed!




References

Call to Action: 


Thursday, August 8, 2019

Hickory Tussock Moth Caterpillar

I was reminded yesterday of a health advisory on the Hickory Tussock Moth Caterpillar I forwarded to friends last year.  The health advisory notice came from the Sunapee Fire Department.

We again have the annual presence of this caterpillar with its allergic reaction or rash to humans.  Below is a picture of the woolly, white caterpillar with black markings and long white hairs. 



We had a hickory tussock moth caterpillar yesterday on our front door. After posting this notice on Facebook yesterday, I received many comments in agreement to the widespread presence of the Hickory Tussock Moth Caterpillar.

Don't touch them if you see them! The hairs of the Hickory Tussock caterpillar, which has black tufts on its back and black spikes, can cause an allergic reaction or rash for some people who make contact with the insect. The caterpillars have microscopically barbed setae, which can cause inflammation.

Watch out for this caterpillar. It is a woolly, white caterpillar with black markings and long white hairs (see above).

Don't touch them if you see them! The hairs of the Hickory Tussock Caterpillar, which has black tufts on its back and black spikes, can cause an allergic reaction or rash for some people who make contact with the insect. The caterpillars have microscopically barbed setae, which can cause inflammation.

This caterpillar appears between June and September and munches its way through the leaves of deciduous trees (it prefers nut-bearing trees, but will settle for willow, ash, aspen, apple, oak, and even raspberry plants and corn stalks).

The caterpillar excretes a type of chemical defense upon contact (which is more 
 appropriately termed "allergenic" than "poisonous").

Most people who handle these creatures will experience a burning, nettle-type, itchy rash of mild to moderate severity, but washing the affected area with soap and water, then applying ammonia or calamine lotion and icing the area should set things to rights.

However, some people are hypersensitive to the poison and have allergic reactions to it in addition to the itchy rash, those persons are likely to experience more severe symptoms such as swelling and nausea and should seek expert medical advice as soon as possible.

To emphasize the impact of the hickory-tussock-moth-caterpillar, below is a picture of a 5-year-old who learned the hard way when he touched the insect, put it on his face and ended up with a nasty rash. 


References

Monday, August 5, 2019

8th Annual Lake Sunapee Cruising Fleet "Poker Run"


Never say, "I wish I had been in the Lake Sunapee Sailing Day Annual Poker Cruise"

When Captain Al asked if Cathy and I wanted to be part of his crew in the Annual Lake Sunapee Sailing Day "Poker Run", we could not pass up this unique outdoor challenge. My motivational mantra, Never say, "I wish I had ..." had to be answered, "Yes!".

The ANNUAL “POKER CRUISE” SAILING DAY HOSTED BY THE LAKE SUNAPEE CRUISING FLEET, promotes sailing fun on Lake Sunapee. All sailboats from sunfish to cruisers to racers are welcome to join a “Poker Cruise”.

Sailing enthusiasts are invited to rendezvous at the Lake Sunapee Cruising Fleet boat just outside Sunapee Harbor. At the Committee Boat each sailboat is given instructions, a map of the course and a playing card. Boats will then sail to four-mark boats on the upper end of the lake.

At the mark each sailboat will receive another playing card. Following the “Poker Cruise” each crew is invited to bring their “poker hand” to a reception sponsored by the Lake Sunapee Cruising Fleet at the Knowlton House (LSPA) in Sunapee Harbor. There are prizes will be awarded for the best poker hands and for the best themed crew costumes.

In case you cannot tell, Captain Al’s crew costume theme is that of being WACKY WAHINES (Goggle "wacky wahines" .)






References

Call to Action: 


Saturday, August 3, 2019

Using My Browning Trail Camera in Sunapee, NH

This post is for friends to comment on my trail camera experience.  Let me give a disclaimer here.  I am an outdoor writer and the videos and pictures I use in my books and blog posts all are taken by me. The Browning is my first use of a trail camera.  Suggestions and comments are most welcome.

I selected the Browning Trail Camera Model BTC-5HDPX because it received a very positive online review.  My criteria were: 1) Ability to talk to a company specialist if I had camera set-up and operation questions. 2) Fairly easy set-up - I am not a camera expert. 3) Quality pictures and videos I could use with minimum editing in my books and blog. 4) Night pictures and videos. 5) Medium pricing.
Can you spot the camera?


After nearly two months of use, the Browning Trail Camera Model BTC-5HDPX has proven my selection.

The most current video is first.  The third video is my initial use of the trail  camera. I first placed the Browning Trail Camera Model BTC-5HDPX on a wooded trail in Sunapee, NH.  The area is close to where I live.

I am learning more about the camera each time I move the camera to a new location:

  • Weeds and over-hanging leaves - and even rain - can set off the camera - giving us beautiful pictures, but no wildlife. Placement of the camera needs an unobstructed view.
  • Pesky squirrels scrambling up trees and inquisitive deer are all part of wildlife pictures.
----- October 14
My friend Mike accompanied me as I kayaked in an isolated area to check my latest camera placement. Not intentionally on my part, the camera placement filmed me both exiting and entering my kayak. I frequently get ask, "What is the best way to enter and exit a kayak?" I included in the below video the method I frequently use, where I use my paddle as a brace between the shore (in this case a rock) and my kayak.

Upon looking at the captured videos, the surprise was a pack of coyotes crossing a natural bridge of branches, rocks and mud.  See if you can count the number of coyotes.



-----September 17 through September 24
Leaving the camera in a three secluded wilderness sections of Sunapee, NH has provided new surprises. A roaming bobcat was seen prowling twice. A spooked coyote was interesting. My first glimpse of a beaver was nice, although I wanted more detail.  Maybe next time. Hearing and seeing a Pileated woodpecker was an absolute shock! Enjoy.




------August 9 through August 14

Here we have a five day video from a second location.  We indeed saw some exciting wildlife activity. 



-----July 31 thru August 3rd

Below are my first three days with my new wildlife camera. I edited out all videos started by wind from nearby weeds. I also split videos that did not contain significant information as I continue to learn this camera and where to place it.

The doe with her fawn was interesting. The coyote was a surprise.  We have heard them at night, but never saw one. The way a coyote walks and its size make me sure this is a coyote.

Enjoy - and please send me your comments.



https://www.outdoorsteve.com

Call to Action: 


Monday, July 1, 2019

A Teaching Moment - How to Remove a Tick


Three days ago, I did a blog post video on How to Remove a Tick. I showed this video to friends, and many laughed at it, while some said, "ugh" and a few said "disgusting."  One said, “I just flick them off with my finger.” The “flick them off” is undoubtedly the best choice for tick removal, BUT what if the tick’s head is embedded in the skin!!

See this first video at https://outdooradventurers.blogspot.com/2019/06/outdoor-steve-removes-tick.html

Within an hour of this video, and the accompanying comments, my youngest sister yelled, "You have a tick on your neck!" My first reaction was, "Ticks are not a joke." Other friends gathered around, and sure as can be, a tick was embedded.

I removed my HOW TO REMOVE A TICK vee notch card from my wallet.  Fortunately, my camera was nearby, and I asked a friend to document this "Teaching Moment" on how to remove an embedded tick.  After removal, wash the bite site with soap and warm water.

Hey, some guys are "Chick Magnets.“ Does this make me a "Tick Magnet?"



I have also used fine-tipped tweezers to remove a tick. If using tweezeers, grasp the part of the tick that's closest to your skin -- you want to grab the head, not the belly. Slowly pull the tick straight out, without twisting it. 

Do not have a tick removal notch card?  Quickly make your own from a like plastic card as seen in the video below:  


References 


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Call to Action: 


Friday, June 28, 2019

Hiking Mount Moosilauke New Hampshire

Start: Ravine Trail to Gorge Brook to Summit. Return:
Carriage Trail to Snapper Trail to Gorge Brook and back to Ravine
Lodge

My friend John organized a mid-June trip for three friends to hike with him up Mt Moosilauke in Benton, NH. Mount Moosilauke is a 4,802-foot high mountain with a 7.2 mile moderately trafficked loop trail rated as difficult by Alltrails.com.

The Gorge Brook trailhead starts at the Dartmouth College Ravine Lodge directly to the summit dome. F
rom the Summit our return route  is the Carriage Road trail to the South Peak. This section of the Carriage Trail follows the Appalachian Trail (AT.) Where the AT turns right on South Peak, we keep on the Carriage Trail until the junction where it meets the Snapper Trail. The Snapper Trail meets the Gorge Brook trail about a half mile from the start of our Ravine Lodge trailhead. 

A large cairn with a sign marks the top of Mount Moosilauke.



We planned a one mile per hour speed with a good half hour at the top, weather permitting. The peak is wide open, so our stay depends on the weather, such as wind, temperature and rain. 8 am to 4 pm on the trail is our conservative estimate. We pretty much stayed with our plan, mainly because the rating of Difficulty was very appropriate for this senior group.

Highlights of our hike:

  • The weather was perfect – 70 degrees, light wind, and moderate sun.
  • We all had walking sticks – speaking for myself, these “extra two legs” helped my balance as most of the trail was a rock-strewn path with rock steps in a mostly dried stream. We went up – up- and up.
  • We stopped for water and Gatorade every 10 to 20 minutes, as well as nibbling on trail mix and nourishment bars. This water and protein discipline was necessary given the difficulty of the rock-laden trail that required all our strength and concentration. 
  • We switched leaders every 30 minutes or so. The rotation of leaders allowed our group to stay together, and pace moderately,
  • As we neared four hours on the trail, we were ready with exhausted and anticipation to reach the top. This summit expectation was temporarily put on hold with a moment of tired disappointment, when upon reaching the above treeline plateau, and expecting this to be the summit, we saw in the distance a peak marker that was so far away. As a hiker heading down passed us, I asked, “Is that the peak way up there?” She responded, “Yes, but it is not as long as it LOOKS.” At first her comments did not pick up our spirits, but as we quickly closed the open distance between us and the top, we realized she was correct. Whew!
  • On the trip up, the bugs were no issue, but on the return trip the bugs were overwhelming, and we had to stop and spray ourselves with bug repellant, or, like John and I did, put on our bug nets
  • That evening at dinner, we all agree Mt Moosilauke took our full effort … we left no regrets of “Giving it all we had on the mountain.”
  • Personally, hindsight says I should have prepared better for Mt Moosilauke by doing short local hikes of one to three hours. This nearly eight hour very strenuous hike required more effort than merely my preparation of rowing and running twice week.

References

Saturday, June 22, 2019

How to Remove a Tick


I stepped out of the shower and noticed what appeared to be a scab on my shin.  I did not remember hitting my leg.  I rubbed "the scab" and the end came up. I then saw the legs of a tick.

Hey, I have a tick stuck on my lower left leg.

I went to my "How to Remove a Tick" card I carry in my wallet.  I then proceeded to remove the tick. I first came in with the notch from the head side of the tick, and this did not loosen the tick. On my second try I placed the card notch in the back side of the tick, and this attempt very efficiently removed the tick.

Notice in the video the white material in the tick's mouth. I assume this is my skin.

I am sending this video to the New Hampshire Fish and Game for identification of the type of tick.

As mentioned in the video, I encourage you to pause the video and read the "How to Remove a Tick" card.




Three days later, I had another tick removed. See A Teaching Moment: How to remove a tick

Do not have a tick removal notch card? Quickly make your own from a like plastic card as seen in the video below: 





References 

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Call to Action: