Thursday, April 29, 2021

Hiking Gunnison Lake (“The Goshen Ocean”)

 

Outdoor Recreation for Seniors (ORFS) hike the three-mile Ruth LeClair Trail around Gunnison Lake, Goshen, NH

Referred by locals as, “The Goshen Ocean,” its formal name is Lake Gunnison.  The lake is man-made and provides opportunity for swimming, hiking, and kayaking. The lake is on the backside of Mt Sunapee, and the view of Mt Sunapee from the Gunnison Lake is spectacular. 


Gunnison Lake is in Goshen, NH.  From nearby Newport, take Route 10-S for a mile or so, and then a left on Rt 31 (an immediate steep hill.)  Gunnison Lake Road is on the left, clearly marked about a mile up Rt 31. Click the below video and join the ORFS as they hike around Gunnison Lake.

The three-mile Ruth LeClair woodland loop trail around the Lake took our group about one hour and thirty minutes.  The Lake is in view all the time. Be careful of roots and mud (during wet times.)  There are many small wooden bridges crossing streams into the Lake. Some of the bridges are planks, and most are rather old, so be careful when crossing.

Who are the ORFS?
The Outdoor Recreation for Seniors (ORFS) group meets every Tuesday year-round at 10 am. In the summer we kayak/canoe, bike, swim and hike. In the fall we hike and bike, and in the winter we snowshoe and cross-country ski. Our trips are from 1-1/2 to 2 hours, followed by lunch.

Directions and location are available for our Tuesday 10 am outings via email and the monthly New London Chapin Senior Center Courier newsletter. To learn more and join, contact the Chapin Senior Center at 357 pleasant Street, PO Box 1263, New London, New Hampshire 03752 or go to their web site at http://www.coachapincenter.org

ORFS is a very informal group and participation is for all outdoor enthusiasts wanting guaranteed good exercise with a friendly fun group.

" Everyone must do something. I believe I will go outdoors with family and friends"

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Steve’s books are available as hardcopy and e-Books at Amazon's Kindle and hardcopy at Morgan Hill Bookstore, New London, NH, Colby-Sawyer College, New London, NH, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Gift Shop, Lebanon, NH, and Village Sports, New London, NH.


Outdoor Play has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. The book will motivate friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life. If you want 5 or more books signed, send Steve an email and we can work out the logistics. 




Additional Sources of Books at:
Hardcopy at: http://outdoorsteve.com and https://www.amazon.com/dp/098503842X
E-book at: https://www.amazon.com/dp/098503842X

Sunday, March 28, 2021

Cooking an Egg N an Onion N an Open Campfire


A recent Great North Woods paddling and camping trip to northern New Hampshire’s Lake Francis, allowed me to take my campsite experience a bit further. Paul Tawrell's outdoor enthusiast book, Wilderness Camping and Hiking, described a method to cook an egg over an open campfire in an onion. Being one to never say, "I wish I had cooked an egg in an onion over an open campfire", I decided to try Paul's recommendation.


I submitted a video of this cooking experience in the short documentary category for the Florida Short Film Festival
I received notice the project status has been updated to semi-finalist.  An internal committee will review the film more carefully and announce the winners for this season on April 30.

I presented a 30-second trailer promotional video, and the full five-minute video.


                                       30-Second Trailer:

Five-minute Short Documentary:

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Steve’s books are available as hardcopy and e-Books at Kindle and hardcopy at Morgan Hill Bookstore, New London, NH, Colby-Sawyer College, New London, NH, and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Gift Shop, Lebanon, NH.

Outdoor Play has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. The book will motivate friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life. If you want 5 or more books signed, send Steve an email and we can work out the logistics. 




Additional Sources of Books at:
Hardcopy at: http://outdoorsteve.com and https://www.amazon.com/dp/098503842X
E-book at: https://www.amazon.com/dp/098503842X




Wednesday, February 17, 2021

The Ballad of the Allagash

Fellow Outdoor Adventurers,

Woods Hole Film Festival will soon hold their summer film festival.  Given our Allagash Wilderness Waterway (AWW) and Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT) accomplishments, I have decided to submit a film documenting our memories
.  The AWW serves as the eastern-most section of the 740-mile Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT). Sections 12 and 13 of the NFCT overlap the Allagash for nearly 90-miles from Chamberlain Lake to St John River at Allagash Village. 

If you remember, a while back, Linwood and I asked all who had been on the Allagash trips for one or more verses to be used to write "The Ballad of the Allagash."  This film uses the Ballad we wrote as the foundation for this video. I trust the memories will still be there for you.

I suggest you sit your friends and family down, make some popcorn, gather your favorite drink, and together watch this half hour draft of The Ballad of the Allagash.  Keep notes!

Here is 
a 60-second trailer to promote the "The Ballad of the Allagash."

A Thirty-Minute Film: "The Ballad of the Allagash"

Please send me your comments on both videos.

---------------------------------------

Without a doubt, the Allagash Wilderness Waterway (Allagash, AWW) in northern Maine rates as the brightest among the jewels of Maine’s wilderness state parks and historic sites.  Some 104 miles end-to-end, the Waterway offers the canoer both lake and river paddling environments, including primitive camping, portages, class 2 whitewater paddling on 5-mile Chase Rapids, remnants of the century-old Eagle Lake tramway built to aid transporting logs to the papermills, and the 40’Allagash Falls. 

The pictures and videos in this film are a composite of three Allagash trips guided by Loon Parsons. 

This presentation has four parts.

  1.  First, meet the film paddlers – The Loon and the Chickadee.  And the fifteen paddlers they guided on week-long adventures of Allagash insights, history lessons, teaching paddling skills, and the peace of the remote north country, called the Allagash Wilderness Waterway.
  2. Second, watch the briefs from the trips to get insight into the verses sung in the Allagash Ballad. See, our paddlers do a canoe rescue for two of our group in the middle of Eagle lake. See father-son combinations run the hazards and remnants of Long Lake Dam. Hear why Folger’s Black Silk coffee is forever cherished.
  3. Next, hear Tim’s interview on his seven trips in Maine with “The Loon “and “The Chickadee,” and memories to be heard in The Ballad of the Allagash.
  4. Finally, is The Ballad of the Allagash, sung to Janis Joplin’s melody, “Oh, Lord, won’t you buy me a Mercedes Benz.“ All the verses are composed by individuals who experienced paddling the Allagash Wilderness Waterway with Master Maine Guide Loon and his wife, The Chickadee.” Each stanza of the ballad reflects a special Allagash moment.

Allagash Wilderness Waterway (AWW) - Three Trips

The map here shows in red the three put-ins, one at Johnson Pond, and two at Indian Steam. Our take-outs are at St John River in Allagash Village, Maine, near the New Brunswick, Canadian border. Johnson Pond was a 104-mile eight-day paddle, and Indian Steam, a 94-mile six-day paddle. The blue arrows are the northern paddling downstream route.

Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT

The Allagash also serves as the eastern-most section of the 740-mile Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT). Sections 12 and 13 of the NFCT overlap the Allagash for nearly 90-miles from Chamberlain Lake to St John’ River at Allagash Village.

Section 12 is a 41-mile paddle from Umbazooksus Stream to the Umsaskis Lake outlet to where Section 13 begins. As seen in the map, from our Johnson Pond put-in, we joined the designated NFCT Section 12 in Chamberlain Lake before the Lock Dam.

Our Indian Stream put-in meets NFCT Section 12 in Eagle Lake.


NFCT Section 12 is a 41-mile paddle from Umbazooksus Stream to the Umsaskis Lake outlet to where Section 13 begins. From our Johnson Pond put-in, we paddle across Chamberlin Lake joining the designated NFCT Section 12. The Indian Stream put-in joins NFCT Section 12 in Eagle Lake.

First roamed by native Abnaki Indians in search of food and furs, then in the 1800s by lumbermen in search of virgin timber for logs and pulpwood, the Allagash today is visited by the adventurist paddler seeking a deep backwoods experience in wilderness camping.




Our Daily Paddle and Campsites

Each day begins from your tent, a campfire breakfast, packing of tents, gear, and canoes, and then paddle northeast downstream to experience an assortment of streams, lakes, rivers, and white water. Remember, the Allagash flows northeast. Each day ends after eight to twenty miles of sometimes challenging paddling and all the while seeing an abundance of wildlife from the majestic moose to our national bird, the bald eagle.

 We locate a campsite, prepare a campfire, set up tents, maybe a swim, enjoy a well-earned dinner, see a beautiful sunset, followed by campfire stories and tales of the day. Then comes a deep sleep in the Allagash Wilderness waterway. The next morning we continue our daily routine and look forward to the day’s paddle and confronts.

The Allagash Wilderness Waterway is rich in historical points of interest from those by-gone eras. 

We explored the “Tramway” that connects Eagle Lake with Chamberlain Lake and see the locomotives that ran between Eagle and Umbazooksus lakes in the early 1900’s lumbering era.

 At Churchill Dam, preparing for paddling the 5-mile Chase Rapids in empty canoes, we left our gear with a park ranger, who brought our bags to the end of Chase Rapids.

Twelve miles from Allagash Village, we portage the most incredible spectacle on the river; the 40-foot high Allagash Falls, a thundering, boiling cauldron of power and beauty.

A week or so later, after paddling 100 miles, we are at Allagash Village, where the Allagash River and the St John River meet on the Canadian border.


Indeed, paddling the Allagash is a bucket list of treasured memories. These remembrances are shared and made lasting in The Ballad of the Allagash.

 References

Map-Paddling the Allagash Wilderness Waterway https://www.maine.gov/dacf/parksearch/Pro

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The Ballad of the Allagash Wilderness Waterway

(To the tune of “Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a Mercedes-Benz” (Janis Joplin)

Introduction to Ballad by Steve

This Allagash Wilderness Waterway Ballad video was prepared from participants’ memorable moments of expeditions guided by Registered Master Maine Guide Linwood Parsons and his wife Betty.

Without a doubt, the Allagash Wilderness Waterway rates as the gem of Maine’s wilderness areas.

The verses of this Ballard are to the tune of Janis Joplin, “Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a Mercedes-Benz.”

The Ballad of the Allagash Wilderness Waterway

 (Kathy)

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a big can of Ben’s.

I’m out in the woods now,

The flies never end.

Got bitten all over,

No help from my friends.

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a big can of Ben’s.

 

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a bed of my own.

A mattress and box spring

That’s not on the ground.

Last night I got bruises,

I slept on a stone.

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a bed of my own.

 

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a roll of TP.

Those baked beans of Betty’s

Are getting to me.

Been wiping with leaves

Til I got poison ivy.

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a roll of TP.

 (Linwood)

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a deputy’s badge.

We helped save two druggies

At Little Allagash.

Ole Andy was naked,

And Tara was scared.

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a deputy’s badge.

 

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me new waterproof gear.

“Dry bags” became “wet bags”

When we sank to our ear.

We swam down the rapids

A chasin’ the beer.

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me new waterproof gear.

 (Betty)

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a few more good years.

To paddle with Linwood

And Harry mit beers.

Chase Rapids with Karen

Without many fears.

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a few more good years.

 (Karen)

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me an instant campfire.

No sawing of firewood,

No stripping of bark.

No pleading with Linwood

Or Harry to lite it.

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me an instant campfire.

(Harry)

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a brand new spruce paddle.

Chase Rapids are coming,

Excitement is high.

Cross draw, sweep, and a pry,

Til we all finished dry.

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a brand new spruce paddle.

 (Steve)

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a Maine Master Guide.

To show us the Allagash,

In swagger and stride.

And teach us canoe rescue,

And a loon landing wildlife bona fide.

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a Maine Master Guide.


Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a Chickadee and a Loon.

The bread in the Dead,

Cornish hen in the coffee can.

Folger’s Black Silk,

and a pudding lid spoon.

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a Chickadee and a Loon.

 

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a campsite to rest.

Spruce gum for the rookie,

Counting moose at its best.

A swim though the rapids,

Flint and steel for our test.

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a campsite to rest.

 (Steve)

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a Long Lake Dam

A dam to portage if you can,

Or paddle at risk and I’ll be dam.

A spike waiting to rip the canoe,

Tim and Steve paddled be dammed.

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a Long Lake Dam.

 (Tim)

Oh lord take me down to the Allagash now.

Take me to the north woods,

 Where the moose runs wild and proud.

To see the eagles soar,

As I relax on the shore.

Oh lord take me down to the Allagash now.

 

Oh Lord, won't you buy me some rapids right now.

The "V" through the rocks

will guide us somehow.

The draw stroke shall save us

with a quick turn of the bow.

Oh Lord, won't you buy me some rapids right now.

 (Dundee)

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me more beer.

To help me create more cairns made of stone,

And the whistles of willow,

And the white birch bark stars.

So much more to create, so

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me more beer!

 (Paul)

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a big ole white sail.

I’m on Eagle Lake and,

The wind never fails.

My arms ache from paddlin’,

Oh, S#%t is that hail?

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a big ole white sail.

 (Linwood)

Oh Lord, won't you buy me a big ole fat fish.

I'll gut him and skin him,

Then he'll land in my dish.

An eighteen inch Brookie,

Now that'd be my wish.

Oh Lord, won't you buy me a big ole fat fish.

 (Linwood)

Oh Lord, won't you buy me a bigger Canoe.

'Cause the one I have now,

Just simply won't do.

Need more room for the beer,

for the hard strokin' Crew.

Oh Lord, won't you buy me a bigger Canoe.

 (Rick)

Oh Lord, won't you buy me some stars in the Sky.

They look near at hand,

yet, are so high.

I'm just a lightening bug seeking a mate,

in the heavens above, but I'm feeling spry.

Oh Lord, won't you buy me some stars in the Sky.

(Steve)

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me paddlers so grand.

Dundee is prepared,

And navigates first hand.

Timothy skilled in the stern,

When the river gets tough he insures the turn

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me paddlers so grand.

 

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a campfire recipe.

Garret flint and steel,

Tim saws wood fire-to-be.

Linwood’s cuisine is five-star,

Lobster and eggs benedict are the par.

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me a campfire recipe.

 

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me “Never say I wish I had …”

For eight days we were in awe of the Allagash and the Loon,

Our skills grew as we paddled in tune.

Coolers with names of rivers,

All are lifetime of memories delivered.

Oh Lord, won’t you buy me “Never say I wish I had …”

 +++++++++++++++++++

 

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Tuesday, February 9, 2021

Paddling the Northern Forest Canoe Trail Long Lake to Village of Saranac


Fellow Outdoor Adventurers,

Paddling Film Festival World Tour will soon hold a film festival. I selected this particular film company because we have attended prior shows by them, and they had no NFCT films. Given our many Northern Forest Canoe Trail accomplishments, I have decided to submit a movie of our NFCT Section 2 experience for the canoeing documentary category.

I suggest you sit your friends and family down, make some popcorn, gather your favorite drink, and together watch this draft of the Paddling the Northern Forest Canoe Trail Long Lake to Village of Saranac.

Please send me your comments on the video.

Here is the 50-second Trailer I developed to promote the 50-minute "Paddling the Northern Forest Canoe Trail Long Lake to Village of Saranac."


50-Minute Film


--Below is the Description I will include along with the video--
Welcome to the Northern Forest Canoe Trail. The NFCT is a living reminder of when rivers were highways and communication routes. The Trail is 740-miles of historic waterway traveled by Native Americans. Its west to east direction begins in Old Forge, New York, and travels through Vermont, Quebec, New Hampshire, and ends in Fort Kent, Maine.

The NFCT is divided into 13 sections and has detailed maps for each section. Our journey was Section 2 in the Adirondack and Saranac region of northern New York. We began at the Long Lake bridge paddling in a north-east direction and ended 42-miles and 3 ½ days later at the Village of Saranac. Our trip included transfers through two hand-operated locks to convey paddlers between waterways and three very demanding portages totaling 11.5 plus miles.

Our 3 ½ day itinerary:
  • Day 1: A 15-mile paddle on Long Lake, then a 1.6-mile portage around Raquette falls – which took three trips for a hike of 4.8-miles - with our day ending at the Palmer Brook lean-to on the Raquette River.
  • Day 2: Raquette River to Stony Creek Ponds, a 1.1-mile Indian Carry portage - which took five trips for 5.5-miles - and the .4-mile, Bartlett Carry, into Middle Saranac Lake for a paddle to our campsite on Norway Island. We paddled twelve-miles on Day 2.
  • Day 3: We paddled through the Upper Locks into Lower Saranac Lake to our campsite on Partridge Island. About an 8-mile paddling day.
  • Day 4: Lower Saranac Lake to First Pond into Second Pond and through the Lower Locks of the Saranac River into Oseetah Lake, and then into Lake Flower for our take-out at the Village of Saranac Lake. An 8-mile paddling day.
This Section 2 water highway has no fresh drinking water sources. Dehydration can be a major issue. We restocked our drinking water at night, boiling lake water with our Jet Boil.

On day 3 we paddled from our Norway Island campsite on Middle Saranac Lake to Partridge Island campsite in Lower Saranac Lake. We started day 3 with another great breakfast by Chef John. We appreciate John's menu planning, food acquisition, and indeed, his meals are fit for royalty.

We paddled through the self-operated Uppers Lock from Middle Saranac Lake to Lower Saranac. Enjoy our video of our lock transition as we thoroughly appreciated the experience of going from a higher lake to a lower lake – bypassing a strict set of rapids.

On our last day on Section 2 of the NFCT we paddled from our Partridge Island campsite through another hand-operated lock to Oseetah Lake. Experience the transitory and unique Lower Lock feeling of our canoes and gear being transported via water from Lower Saranac Lake to Oseetah Lake.

The paddling was easy and we soaked in the wilderness and beauty of the Adirondacks.  We saw deer, huge rock formations, swam in the lakes each evening, and watched sunsets from our island campsites.  

After we did our final take-out  at the Village, we went to the NFCT Kiosk and signed the NFCT log book.

Never say, "I wish I had paddled the Northern Forest Canoe Trail Section 2 in the Adirondack and Saranac wilderness."

Tuesday, January 19, 2021

Hiking the Fabled Knife Edge Trail

Fellow Knife Edge Hiking Colleagues and Outdoor Adventurers:

A film festival will soon be held, including a category for short documentary films. Given, I am still enthralled with our Knife Edge accomplishments, I have decided to submit a documentary of our Knife Edge Trail experience.

The below 30-minute video has many pictures and videos you have never seen. When I did my original video, it was seven-minutes and did not include any of the return hike after we reached Baxter Peak and only a few of the videos and pictures of us reaching the Knife Edge Trail start.

I suggest you sit your friends and family down, make some popcorn, gather your favorite drink, and together watch this draft of the Knife Edge documentary.  Please send me your comments on the video.

I plan to submit the video by April 15th.

Here is the 50-second Trailer I developed to promote the half-hour "Hiking the Fabled Knife Edge Trail."


Here is the half-hour film.  



------------------------------Intro Narrative----------------------------

I present the Knife Edge Trail, a 15-hour and 11-mile hike, followed by the trail mapping that took months to decide. Five friends and I will take you with us, share the Knife Edge experience, and then discuss the planning.

We planned a long day of hiking, only to find a day and evening of climbing. The plan seemed relatively straightforward:
  1. Hike to Baxter Peak, the northern terminus of the 2,162 mile Appalachian Trail (AT).
  2. Cross the fabled 1.1 mile Knife Edge Trail.
  3. Hike five miles on the AT starting at its northern beginning at Baxter Peak.
A footpath by the loosest of definitions, the ridge-jagged Knife Edge can be as narrow as the width of your laptop computer screen with thousand-foot drop-offs on both sides of the ridge. The 1.1-mile Knife Edge Trail in Baxter State Park, Maine, is often described as the most dangerous trail in New England. The crossing was a two-hour scramble, balancing act, crawling, scooting on our buts, while on a peaked rock-strewn ridge stretching from Pamola Peak across Chimney Peak (4902 feet) and South Peak to Baxter Peak (5267 feet) on Mt Katahdin. Baxter Peak is the northern start of the 2,200 mile Appalachian Trail.

You cannot drive or paddle to reach the Knife Edge Trail. First, it takes a 7-hour uphill hike from Roaring Brook campground to Chimney Peak to get to the beginning of the notorious and legendary Knife Edge Trail. Next, after a two hours hike described above, you finally arrive at the northern terminus of the Appalachian Trail at Mt Katahdin's Baxter Peak. And remember, what goes up a mountain, must come down. After reaching your Baxter Peak goal via the Knife Edge Trail, you now must hike down five miles on Mt Katahdin's Appalachian Trail in more treacherous ridge terrain for six hours to return to the Katahdin Stream Campground.

Be prepared to close your eyes if you are severely afraid of heights.

"Everyone should believe in something. I believe I’ll go Outdoors.” 

Steve’s books are available as paperback and e-Books at KindleAmazon, Morgan Hill Bookstore (New London, NH), Colby-Sawyer College, and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Gift Shop (Lebanon, NH.)
For more of Steve’s outdoor guidebooks and documentary videos, visit OutdoorSteve.com and

Wednesday, December 30, 2020

Iceboating in New Hampshire


Let's go iceboating!

It is a rare day in New Hampshire to get perfect conditions for iceboating. We need thick ice, meaning 4 inches or more of ice, and smooth ice – requiring no excessive ice cracks or ice berms, and minimal snow to stop or grab the steel blades.

The sun was bright. The temperature was 18 degrees, impacted by a biting 20 – 30 mph wind. I removed my glove only long enough to take pictures and short videos. I then immediately returned the hand to the glove's sanctuary for immediate relief for the frozen hand. 

Our location is Perkins Pond in Sunapee, New Hampshire.  From the middle of the Pond, we get a direct view of the magnificent Mount Sunapee.


A Rare Opportunity

Iceboating can be a unique experience. Once you get over the initial, "What am I doing here" feeling, you sense being one with the boat. You hear the wind in the sail and the rumble of the runners over the ice. Indeed, at 18 degrees, you must dress in layers for relative comfort.

Learn More About Dundee's Iceboat

Our good friend, Dundee, is a very creative and skilled person. Today he would share his personally crafted iceboat for us – Steve M, Leslie, David, and myself.


 
Three 10" angle iron blades called "runners" support a triangular-shaped wooden frame with a front steering tiller made from an old hockey stick. The blades are attached to the boat, one on each end of the rear cross plank and one at the fore-end of the hull. The runner blade in the front is capable of rotation controlled by a tiller (the sawed-off hockey stick). There is a backrest cushion seat in the middle for the driver.

Dundee drilled a sail posthole near the front of the boat. In the hole, he positioned the mast from his summer "Sunfish" sailboat. (A Force 5 or Laser sailboat mast will work just as well.) A rope is tied to the sail and used by the driver to control the sail.
The boat with sail weighs about 150 lbs.

Starting, Steering, and Stopping

The boat is usually started by putting the boat sideways to the wind. You then pull onto the sail to capture the wind – and off you go. Making a U-turn is a learned technique, as if you turn too slowly you eventually slow the boat and stop. Good luck getting it moving again with body humping inside the craft, or worst, getting out and pushing and returning to the boat with a jump while avoiding getting hit with the boom.

The boat is steered with the hockey stick tiller to direct the front runner.

The driver pulls or releases the sail via the boom rope to angle the sail to catch the wind. The only seeming limitations to iceboat speed are windage, friction, the camber of the sail shape, strength of construction, quality of the ice surface, the level of skill, athleticism, and fearlessness of the sailor. There are many styles of iceboats. It is said, an iceboat of this style can go twice the speed of the wind, i.e., with a 20-mph breeze, your iceboat can reach a speed of nearly 40-mph!

Tacking or coming about, is a sailing maneuver by which a sailing vessel turns its bow into the wind through the 'no-go zone' so that the direction from which the wind blows changes from one side of the vessel to the other. The tacking method gets the iceboat up and down the pond. Catching the wind on an iceboat in the winter is exactly like sailing a sailboat in the summer.

Microspikes – essential for walking on ice

Certainly the sound of the wind is obvious in the video. In addition, the frequent crackling sound in the video is not the wind – it is the sound of microspikes as we walk on the ice. Microspikes offer safety from slips and falls, and give serious traction on ice for walking and tasks such as pushing the iceboat. 

Enjoy the video of friends iceboating in New Hampshire.

References:

Tuesday, December 15, 2020

Hiking New Hampshire's Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway Trail: 75-Miles on a Fourteen Trail Loop


Join Steve Priest as he shares an introduction and video of each of the Fourteen Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway (SRKG) Trails. The videos make the hike “come alive.” Each trail has tips, details on preparation, pictures, maps, and references. 

Select your trail - and CLICK:
  1. SRK Greenway Trail 1 Old Province Rd, Goshen to Newbury Harbor
  2. SRK Greenway Trail 2 Old Province Rd, Goshen to Sunapee Town Hall
  3. SRK Greenway Trail 3 Sunapee to Deerhill Springfield 
  4. SRK Greenway Trail 4 ProtectworthTrail, Springfield, NH
  5. SRK Greenway Trail 5 Springfield/New London to Great Brook Bridge
  6. SRK Greenway Trail 6 Great Brook Bridge to Wilmot 4A Wolf Trees and Trails
  7. SRK Greenway Trail 7 NH Route 4A to WilmotCenter
  8. SRK Greenway Trail 8 Wilmot Center to New Canada Road
  9. SRK Greenway Trail 9 New Canada Road to Proctor Academy
  10. SRK Greenway Trail 10 Proctor Academy to Winslow State Park Mt Kearsage
  11. SRK Greenway Trail 11 Rollins State Park via Lincoln Trail to Kearsarge Valley Road
  12. SRK Greenway Trail 12 – Kearsarge Valley Road to Wadleigh State Park
  13. SRK Greenway Trail 13 - Kezar Lake at Wadleigh Park to Chalk Pond
  14. SRK Greenway Trail 14 – Chalk Pond to Newbury

    Some folks call outdoor experiences “play.” If “play” is defined as the choice made to take a course of action based on the rewards of participation and getting a perspective that can only come from ‘doing,’ then outdoor adventures are play. Many adults and children do not play enough.

    “Everyone should believe in something. I believe I’ll go Outdoors.” 

Sunday, December 6, 2020

Hiking New Hampshire's Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway Trail: 75-Miles on a Fourteen Trail Loop


Join Steve as he shares an introduction and video of each of the Fourteen Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway (SRKG) Trails. The videos make the hike “come alive.” Each trail has tips, details on preparation, pictures, maps, and references. 

Select your trail - and CLICK:
  1. SRK Greenway Trail 1 Old Province Rd, Goshen to Newbury Harbor
  2. SRK Greenway Trail 2 Old Province Rd, Goshen to Sunapee Town Hall
  3. SRK Greenway Trail 3 Sunapee to Deerhill Springfield 
  4. SRK Greenway Trail 4 ProtectworthTrail, Springfield, NH
  5. SRK Greenway Trail 5 Springfield/New London to Great Brook Bridge
  6. SRK Greenway Trail 6 Great Brook Bridge to Wilmot 4A Wolf Trees and Trails
  7. SRK Greenway Trail 7 NH Route 4A to WilmotCenter
  8. SRK Greenway Trail 8 Wilmot Center to New Canada Road
  9. SRK Greenway Trail 9 New Canada Road to Proctor Academy
  10. SRK Greenway Trail 10 Proctor Academy to Winslow State Park Mt Kearsage
  11. SRK Greenway Trail 11 Rollins State Park via Lincoln Trail to Kearsarge Valley Road
  12. SRK Greenway Trail 12 – Kearsarge Valley Road to Wadleigh State Park
  13. SRK Greenway Trail 13 - Kezar Lake at Wadleigh Park to Chalk Pond
  14. SRK Greenway Trail 14 – Chalk Pond to Newbury

    Some folks call outdoor experiences “play.” If “play” is defined as the choice made to take a course of action based on the rewards of participation and getting a perspective that can only come from ‘doing,’ then outdoor adventures are play. Many adults and children do not play enough.

    “Everyone should believe in something. I believe I’ll go Outdoors.” 

    Steve’s books are available as paperback and e-Books at KindleAmazon, Morgan Hill Bookstore (New London, NH), Colby-Sawyer College, and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Gift Shop (Lebanon, NH.)
For more of Steve’s outdoor guidebooks and documentary videos, visit OutdoorSteve.com and


About the Author Stephen L. Priest lives in Sunapee, New Hampshire. He is the author of ten outdoor guidebooks and is a producer of community television outdoor documentaries.  Steve has been a Study Group Leader at Colby-Sawyer College, an assistant professor of information systems at Daniel Webster College (Nashua, NH), and an adjunct professor at Saint Joseph’s College of Maine. Steve has served in the US Army.

Sunday, November 29, 2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE : Steve's Book Outdoor Play Hiking New Hampshire’s Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway Available for Purchase


Sunapee, NH: Steve Priest’s latest book Outdoor Play Hiking New Hampshire’s Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway: 75 Miles on a Fourteen Trail Loop, was released December 1, 2020.


The Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge-Greenway (SKRG) Trail is a hidden gem of New England. Outdoor Steve’s goal is to share each step and strategy of this hiking journey across the Lakes Region of New Hampshire. 

A great Stocking Stuffer for the holidays, Thank You Gift, Table Book, and hiking insights to the SRGK.

Steve recommends the eBook to experience the uniqueness of Hiking New Hampshire’s Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway Trail. (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08MDN1S16)

Steve shares a video of his personal experience on each specific trail. The videos make the hike “come alive.” Each trail story is a short read with tips, details on preparation, pictures, maps, and references. The book is also available in paperback.

Some folks call outdoor experiences “play.” If “play” is defined as the choice made to take a course of action based on the rewards of participation and getting a perspective that can only come from ‘doing,’ then outdoor adventures are play. Many adults and children do not play enough.

“Everyone should believe in something. I believe I’ll go Outdoors.” 

Steve’s books are available as hardcopy and e-Books at Amazon's Kindle and hardcopy at Morgan Hill Bookstore, New London, NH, Colby-Sawyer College, New London, NH, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Gift Shop, Lebanon, NH, and Village Sports, New London, NH.

About the Author Stephen L. Priest lives in Sunapee, New Hampshire. He is the author of ten outdoor guidebooks and is a producer of community television outdoor documentaries. For more of Steve’s outdoor guidebooks and documentary videos, visit OutdoorSteve.com and Outdooradventurers.blogspot.com. Steve has been a Study Group Leader at Colby-Sawyer College, an assistant professor of information systems at Daniel Webster College (Nashua, NH), and an adjunct professor at Saint Joseph’s College of Maine. Steve has served in the US Army.