Friday, July 13, 2018

Mariachi


I am very proud to introduce my brother Edward (Spanish name Lalo). Lalo is a member of a Mexican Mariachi band located in Mexico.  Lalo, a Spanish teacher in a Falmouth, Massachusetts junior high school, regularly visits Mexico during his summer breaks.  He becomes immersed into the Mexican culture and generally goes weeks without speaking English.  While there,Lalo is a student most of the time  receiving lessons in Spannish with other adults seeking to become more flulent and knowledgable with the Spanish language.

As the years have past, Lalo has become good friends with his Mexican host family,  Furthermore, Lalo is a skilled musician, and often plays his instruments with fellow Mexican friends.  A few years past Lalo was asked to play his guitar by a local Mariachi band.  These "guest appearances" become so frequent that he was asked to join the group as a member.  He even purchased a Mariachi outfit.

I am thrilled to show you below two of the times where Lalo was asked to be the lead singer.




Lalo cantando tatuajes.
(Edward singing tattoos)



What is Mariachi?
As copied from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mariachi, 
"Mariachi (/mɑːriˈɑːi/Spanish: [maˈɾjatʃi]) is a musical expression that dates back to at least 18th century in Western Mexico. It is a tradition that can be defined by eight socio-musical elements: mariachi instrumentation and texture, musical genres and subgenres, performance methods and styles, singing styles and forms, dance styles, performative space, performance clothing, and the word "mariachi". Each element has its own history, originated at varying moments in time and in different regions of the Western Mexican countryside, and some, if not all, had to converge in order for the mariachi tradition to become what it is.
From the 19th to 20th century, migrations from rural areas into Guadalajara, along with the Mexican government's cultural promotion gradually re-labeled it as Son style, with its alternative name of “mariachi” becoming used for the “urban” form. Modifications of the music include influences from other music such as polkas and waltzes, the addition of trumpets and the use of charro outfits by mariachi musicians. The musical style began to take on national prominence in the first half of the 20th century, with its promotion at presidential inaugurations and on the radio in the 1920s.
In 2011 UNESCO recognized mariachi as an Intangible Cultural Heritage, joining six other entries on the Mexican list of that category."

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" Everyone must do something.  I believe I will go outdoors with family and friends"

    Steve's 5th book, Outdoor Play Fun 4 4 Seasons Volume II, is now available   

    Outdoor Play Volume II has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. The book motivates friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life. 

    Steve’s books are also available as e-Books at Kindle and hard copy 
    at Amazon.com  

    Sunday, June 24, 2018

    Three Generation Paddling in Saranac Lake


    A celebration of high school graduations for Carson and Nicholas on Section 2 of the Northern Forest Canoe Trail.  We wish them both success in their academic and outdoor endeavors - Carson at the University of Mississippi, and Nicholas in the United States Navy serving our country.

    Preparation
    • 3 canoes and one kayak
    • One van carries two canoes, one kayak, camping gear and 2 people
    • One SUV with one canoe, the food and 5 people
    • Paul and Cheryl did the food for the trip.
    • Dundee has the kitchen stuff
    • Everyone brings their own silverware, drinking cups, flashlights, life jacket, paddle, tent, sleeping bag and other “stuff”
    • We will need to buy firewood in New York
    Itinerary


    Sunday 6/17 -  leave Sunapee by 9 am.
    • Drive to Saranac NY to Saranac Lake Islands State Park Campground on Route 3 for check-in registration (about 1 pm)
    • Drive to put in at South Creek Fishing Access site, Route 3, Middle Saranac Lake, unload and drive cars to State Park parking on Lower Saranac Lake and end of trip take out.
    • Paddle to Halfway Island on Middle Saranac Lake to set up camp. (at about 4pm) (Camp site Halfway Island #077)
    Sunday 6/17 and Monday 6/18 -  explore Middle Saranac Lake and Weller Pond
    Tuesday 6/19 -  pack up and paddle down the Saranac river, passing through Upper Lock onto Lower Saranac Lake and set up camp on Larom Island. (#023)
    Wednesday 6/20 – pack up and paddle to State Park take out on Lower Saranac Lake, load up cars and drive back to Sunapee by around 6pm.

    Trip Highlights
    • For most part, four-day weather was between 60 and 75 degrees - excellent. Exception was Day 1 weather in evening was heavy rain, but we set up tarps over camp table, firepit, and tents. Rain no major issue.
    • We all went swimming at both islands – water a bit chilly, but once immersed we were fine.
    • Day 2 paddling to Weller Pond was very scenic.  We explored camp sites, saw pitcher plants, and geese.
    • Day 2 return paddle to Halfway Island was a bit of a challenge with heavy swells, white caps, and wind.  All accomplished this challenge without incident.  Our two recent high school graduates handled the paddling like experienced paddlers with Carson in stern of our canoe and Steve in bow, and Nicholas in his single kayak.
    • Meals all four days were fabulous – thanks to Paul and Cheryl.  Paul and Tim were our chefs.  Nicholas demonstrated some of his cooking skills.  First day afternoon hors d'oeuvres hit the spot after our paddle. Our dinner was steak-tips and Caesar salad. Breakfast each day a choice of eggs with sausage/bacon, bagels, coffee and tang.  Lunches were sandwiches. 2rd night we had pasta and chicken. Third night was sausage and beans.
    • We sat on Halfway Island overlook ledge for a great sunset. 
    • Carson and Nicholas went cliff jumping.
    • While all three canoes were packed with gear, Paul’s blue 18’ canoe held the most.  Check video pictures of how close the blue canoe’s gunnels (the top edge of the side of a boat) were from waterline.
    • Carson and Nicholas rotated between the kayak and canoes to enjoy each boat's uniqueness.
    • Used flint and steel to start our camp fire.
    • We used the RICE method to treat a sprained ankle
    • We experienced another section of the 740 mile Northern Forest Canoe Trail.
    • Disclaimer - due to the importance of this celebation, the below video is detailed and significantly longer than most of my videos. I will be making smaller excerpts of this video in the near future for those readers inclined to pick and chose components of this celebratory paddling trek into the wilderness.


    Cliff Jumping Video


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    " Everyone must do something.  I believe I will go outdoors with family and friends"

      Steve's 5th book, Outdoor Play Fun 4 4 Seasons Volume II, is now available   

      Outdoor Play Volume II has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. The book motivates friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life. 

      Steve’s books are also available as e-Books at Kindle and hard copy 
      at Amazon.com  

      Saturday, June 9, 2018

      ORFS Hike Dexter Inn and Pine Ridge Road Trails - Sunapee, NH

      Members of Outdoor Recreation for Seniors (ORFS) had their Tuesday 10 am hike and lunch led by Al and Eileen.
      • Al described options for hiking paths: dirt road, paved road, and forest.
      • The hike included the trails of Dexter's Inn
      • Our trail visited Crowther Chapel
      • Eileen shared her bear encounter experience.
      • Nancy demonstrated her protection from black flies.
      • Al entertained the group with his rendition of rhyme schemes





      Directions:  from Rte 11 Sunapee, take 103B 1/2 mi, Rt on Stagecoach Rd 1.0 mi, Rt on Young Hill Rd 1/2 mi,  L on Pine Ridge Road – go around loop counter clockwise ¼ mi where you see the view.   


      References
      ++++++++++++++++++

      " Everyone must do something.  I believe I will go outdoors with family and friends"

        Steve's 5th book, Outdoor Play Fun 4 4 Seasons Volume II, is now available   

        Outdoor Play Volume II has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. The book motivates friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life. 

        Steve’s books are also available as e-Books at Kindle and hard copy
        at Amazon.com  

        Sunday, May 27, 2018

        Sky Dive Georgia


        My grandson  Carson, his father Shaun, and his Uncle Tim, celebrated Carson's 2018 graduation from Harrison High School, Kennesaw, Georgia with a tandem sky jump.


        They jumped from 14,600 feet.  The total jump took approximately 4 1/2 minutes. The free fall was one minute, followed by a 3 1/2 minute parachute flight to a safe landing.

        Carson will be attending the University of Mississippi this Fall. 

        Carson's sister, Madison, did the skydive in 2016.  She is a senior at Auburn University.


        Carson Skydiving 2018



        Shaun Skydiving 2018



        Timothy Skydiving 2018



        Maddi Skydiving 2016



        Video by a Proud Grandfather and Father
        Preparation, Pre and Post Interviews


        Never say, " I wish I had been skydiving"

        Sky Dive The Farm

        ++++++++++++++++++

        " Everyone must do something.  I believe I will go outdoors with family and friends"

          Steve's 5th book, Outdoor Play Fun 4 4 Seasons Volume II, is now available   

          Outdoor Play Volume II has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. The book motivates friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life. 

          Steve’s books are also available as e-Books at Kindle and hard copy at Amazon.com 
           

          Wednesday, May 23, 2018

          How close is “too close” when viewing a bear?


          I have lived in New Hampshire for many years and have had glimpses of black bears as they crossed my hiking paths or roads. These brief sightings were so quick I was never able to get a picture.

          I also heard “Do not get too close to a bear – particularly when cubs are present”. With this caution, last Monday I was in my front yard in Bedford, and lo and behold a mother bear with four cubs following, crossed the road … a 100 or so feet in front of me.

          With iPhone in hand, I stealthily walked up the road to see if I could spot where the bears entered the leafy green and dark woods.  I turned onto my neighbor’s lawn outside the forest.

          No sooner did I make the turn, when over the knoll ahead was a large growling upright bear facing me with paws up ready to box.  The mother was protecting her cubs and warning me to “stay away”. With camera rolling, I was able to get a glimpse of her standing.  Then returning to all fours, she lumbered into a dark hole in the forest where she had already cleared her cubs to safety.

          This was my first challenge by a bear – and a warning, “do not get too close”.

          My wife joined me for a view and we watched the bear from the top of the mound ... maybe fifty feet from the dark forest hole where the bear was camouflaged in the woods. We could only see her eyes, nose, and slight body movement. The mother was in front of a tree urging her cubs to climb the tree.

          As we silently watched waiting for a better picture, she unexpectedly roared while rushing a few feet out of the woods  ...  and immediately returned to her black forested cave.  She was again challenging us to keep away from her cubs ... and to leave.

          This was a more vicious second warning "to leave".

          This is when I realized, “too close to a bear”, means being within sight of the bear.

          We retreated to the road, and walked to the other side of the woods. We could see one of the cubs clinging high in a tree.  We knew the mother was still below the treed cubs, and we nervously kept an eye on the ground level, anticipating a charging bear from the woods.

          It was time to leave before my foolish bravery resulted in personal danger.

          My lesson and warning to all my readers is, if you want to observe a wilderness bear, stay out of its sight ... as far away as you can.  Use your zoom camera lens, and if you do not have a zoom lens, then leave.

          Remember, getting close to a bear, means staying out of sight of the bear.



          ++++++++++++++++++

          " Everyone must do something.  I believe I will go outdoors with family and friends"

            Steve's 5th book, Outdoor Play Fun 4 4 Seasons Volume II, is now available   

            Outdoor Play Volume II has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. The book motivates friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life. 

            Steve’s books are also available as e-Books at Kindle and hard copy at Amazon.com  

            Tuesday, May 15, 2018

            Outdoor Recreation for Seniors (ORFS) Hike at Mink Brook Nature Preserve, Hanover, New Hampshire


            Let's go hiking with the ORFS!  Today's outdoor trek will be in Hanover, NH at the Mink Brook Nature Preserve. Weather is sunny and in the low 70's ...AND the black flies are still sleeping!

            The Mink Brook Nature Preserve protects habitat for wild brook trout, bears, and many other creatures while offering a natural retreat within walking distance of downtown Hanover. Owned by the Hanover Conservancy, this 112-acre preserve is the result of deep generosity and community spirit. Through the millennia, Mosbasak Sibosis (“Mink Brook” in Abenaki) has been an important center of life for Native Americans and remains so today. (Mink Brook Nature Preserve Map and Guide)






            The above map’s red arrows begin and end at the Parking (P) area and proceeds through the wooden gate onto Quinn Trail along Mink Brook; continues on the Forest Loop; crosses the Bridge to Trout Brook Trail; and returns back to the Bridge and exits at the wood gate on Quinn Trail.  Our trek took about 1 ½ hours.





            Who are the ORFS?
            The Outdoor Recreation for Seniors (ORFS) group meets every Tuesday year-round at 10 am.  In the summer we kayak/canoe, swim and hike.  In the fall we hike, and in the winter we snowshoe and cross-country ski.  Our trips are from 1-1/2 to 2 hours, followed by lunch.

            Directions and location are available for our Tuesday 10 am outings via email and the monthly New London Chapin Senior Center Courier newsletter. To learn more and join, contact the Chapin Senior Center at 357 pleasant Street, PO Box 1263, New London, New Hampshire 03752 or go to their web site at http://www.coachapincenter.org

            ORFS is a very informal group and participation is for all outdoor enthusiasts wanting guaranteed good exercise with a friendly fun group.

            References

            More Blog Posts on Outdoor Recreation for Seniors (ORFS)
            1. ORFS Winter Hike Puts Safety First: Kidder-Cleveland-Clough Trail


            ++++++++++++++++++

            " Everyone must do something.  I believe I will go outdoors with family and friends"

              Steve's 5th book, Outdoor Play Fun 4 4 Seasons Volume II, is now available   

              Outdoor Play Volume II has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. The book motivates friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life. 

              Steve’s books are also available as e-Books at Kindle and hard copy at Amazon.com  

              Wednesday, April 25, 2018

              Perkins Pond Declares April 24 as 2018 Ice-Out




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              " Everyone must do something.  I believe I will go outdoors with family and friends"

                Steve's 5th book, Outdoor Play Fun 4 4 Seasons Volume II, is now available   

                Outdoor Play Volume II has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. The book motivates friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life. 

                Steve’s books are also available as e-Books at Kindle and hard copy at Amazon.com  

                Sunday, April 15, 2018

                Bowling Day for Outdoor Recreation for Seniors (ORFS)






                Join ORFS
                The Outdoor Recreation for Seniors (ORFS) group meets every Tuesday year-round at 10 am.  In the summer we kayak/canoe, swim and hike.  In the fall we hike, and in the winter we snowshoe, cross-country ski and bowl.  Our trips are from 1-1/2 to 2 hours, followed by lunch.

                Directions and location are available for our Tuesday 10 am outings via email and the monthly New London Chapin Senior Center Courier newsletter. To learn more and join, contact the Chapin Senior Center at 357 pleasant Street, PO Box 1263, New London, New Hampshire 03752 or go to their web site at http://www.coachapincenter.org


                ORFS is a very informal group and participation is for all outdoor enthusiasts wanting guaranteed good exercise with a friendly fun group.
                ++++++++++++++++++

                " Everyone must do something.  I believe I will go outdoors with family and friends"

                  Steve's 5th book, Outdoor Play Fun 4 4 Seasons Volume II, is now available   

                  Outdoor Play Volume II has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. The book motivates friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life. 

                  Steve’s books are also available as e-Books at Kindle and hard copy at Amazon.com  

                  Saturday, April 14, 2018

                  SRK Greenway Trail 7 NH Route 4A to Wilmot Center



                  The Sunapee, Ragged, and Kearsarge (SRK) Greenway is a 75-mile loop of hiking trails in central New Hampshire. The Greenway Trail System circles the Lake Sunapee area and connects Sunapee, Ragged, and Kearsarge Mountains. 

                  Our quest today is shown below: Section 7 topographical map of the SRKG with a descriptive title of Trail 7 NH Route 4A to Wilmot Center.  This 4.4-mile section involves two trails: the Bog Mountain Trail and Kimpton Brook Trail. This was our first time on section 7, specifically Bog Mountain, for Patty, Jim and myself.



                  This Greenway map shows our trip in green. The Greenway estimated time to hike is 3 hours.  On our easterly ascent, we stopped frequently for water breaks, and once for a snack, and took 20 to 30 minutes at the summit.  On our hike down to the western trailhead terminus we stopped a few times for water, and then once for snack.  Our total time for Section 7 was just under four hours.

                  This section of the SRKG is a mixture of well developed wooded trails and woods-logging roads. Our goal was to summit Bog Mountain, 1,787 feet, starting at the eastern trailhead parking lot at the Wilmot Town Hall.  We would be doing all of section 7.  For those hikers wanting a shorter hike to the summit, we did cross two major dirt roads, Stearns Road, and Pocket Road cross woods, that could be used to more readily access the summit.


                  We picked up the bog mountain trail within a minute of walking from the parking lot.  This eastern side of the mountain was very rocky, and reminded me of the saying, “Don’t take NH for Granite”.  The trail up to the summit followed a vein of granite appearing to be centuries ago, reminding me of previous hikes to the White Mountains of NH with plenty of granite rocks. 


                  For most of the eastern trail up to the summit the trapezoid signs readily kept us on the trail.  The views from the barren summit of Bog Mountain was marvelous.  We easily recognized Mt Sunapee and Kearsarge Mountain and their surrounding mountains. Certainly, well worth our trek. 


                  The hike from the summit downward to our western trail terminus was easier than the eastern side.  However, the trail signs from the summit to the western terminus were not always readily visible.  It appears like the signage was made for hikers entering on the western trailhead, as we frequently had to pause to locate the trapezoid signs, and often spotted them only when we looked behind us from whence we came.

                  We exited the Bog Mountain Trail and crossed Stearns Road onto Kimpton Brook Trail.  The Kimpton Brook Trail had large tree blowdowns from winter storms that blocked the trail.  Mixed into this, which made the Kimpton Brook Trail hike exciting, was crossing at least 4 streams by leaping rock to rock, using a blowdown tree, or a hewed log maybe 10 inches in diameter. 


                  We now, never have to say, “I wish I had hiked the SRG greenway section over Bog Mountain.”

                  References


                  ++++++++++++++++++

                  " Everyone must do something.  I believe I will go outdoors with family and friends"

                    Steve's 5th book, Outdoor Play Fun 4 4 Seasons Volume II, is now available   

                    Outdoor Play Volume II has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. The book motivates friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life. 

                    Steve’s books are also available as e-Books at Kindle and hard copy at Amazon.com  

                    Tuesday, April 10, 2018

                    February and April Snowboarding and Downhill Skiing in New Hampshire



                    April 2018: Two Days at Mount Sunapee and One Day at Okemo Mountain


                    For a bonus video check out Carson, Nicholas, and Tim skiing Mt. Sunapee in February





                    ++++++++++++++++++

                    " Everyone must do something.  I believe I will go outdoors with family and friends"


                      Steve's 5th book, Outdoor Play Fun 4 4 Seasons Volume II, is now available   

                      Outdoor Play Volume II has trip preparations, routes, and narratives of bucket list places to go. The book motivates friends and family to make the outdoors a key component of their daily life. 

                      Steve’s books are available as an e-Book at Kindle and hard copy at Amazon.com